The Problem with Dr. Oz’s 4-Step Butt-Blasting Plan

Usually a defender of a low-carb diet, Dr. Oz surprises with his recommendation of high carbs for his 4-Step Butt-Blasting Plan. I explore two problems with his plan.

Can butt fat be blasted away with a high carb diet?

I’M SOMETIMES conflicted over the Dr. Oz Show.

On one hand I think the material is presented too simplistically; at times, I get the feeling that there’s a competition backstage among the staff about how to make the illustrative examples as dumbed down as possible.

That’s the one hand.

The other concedes that Dr. Oz and his staff truly know their audience, and thereby recognize that simple is better.  Perhaps my, in effect, high school knowledge about health matters is not educated nor delighted by his grade school presentations.

There’s one more thing.

The good doctor needs to produce a show five days a week, every week.  I’m guessing that this effort does not allow for much integration of material.

For instance, in one episode, Dr. Oz will have an expert telling us to use almond butter rather than peanut butter because it has healthier fats and more nutrition (which is true).  But then in a few episodes down the road, the Ozman will be promoting peanut butter without mention that almond butter is a better alternative.

Another example, and this one is pertinent to the subject of this post, Dr. Oz has spent several episodes properly extolling the benefits of minimizing carbohydrates and eating only those with a low glycemic load (low calories plus slow blood glucose uptake).  Then in his “4-Step Butt-busting Plan” show, he reverses course and dives into a treatise that says high carbs are best for reducing butt fat.

Now I’m sitting there watching this and I keep waiting for him to integrate what he’s saying about reducing the butt fat by eating more carbs and less fat with his prior admonition to eat less carbs.

It doesn’t happen.  He does nothing to integrate the two positions.

Standing around Dr. Oz on this butt-blasting show is a bevy of over-large women dressed in t-shirts and Speedo-type “shorts”.  Indelicately I say — everything is hanging out on everyone so dressed.  I’m amazed at the persuasive powers of whoever talked these women into wearing such garments.

The Oz then proceeds to tell the women about his 4-step butt-blasting plan. It consists of eating no more than 275 grams of carbs, 150 grams of protein, and 34 grams of fat.

That would make the total day’s food consumption equal to 459 grams, of which the carbs represents 61% of the total!  Know that experts on the matter suggest that total daily carbs be limited to about 25 – 40% of the total food consumed in order to lose weight.

Now, I give Dr. Oz the benefit of the doubt that the research he’s relying on says fat calories go like some magnet to the butt, and thus to reduce butt fat, one must reduce fat consumption.

And, of course, the body uses carbs as fuel, so to continue with this idea: the extra carbs will fuel the butt-busting exercises that Oz recommends.

I submit to you that there are at least two problems with this advice:

1. Like the rest of the industrialized world, these women undoubtedly got fat from eating too many “simple” (high glycemic) carbs to begin with.  To suggest they focus more on carbs, particularly without an education about what constitutes “good” carbs, is throwing fuel on the fire.

[Read my post, What's Making America Fat?]

2. These women are just not big in the derrière, but everywhere.  So even if this butt fat reducing protocol was useful to blast away butt fat, what about the rest of their overlarge body parts?  These grew overlarge because of over consumption of carbs, and will remain so if a carb-dominant diet is adopted.

If Dr. Oz were to read this post, I’m confident he could decisively argue in favor of his suggestion, but I doubt if he could accomplish this without adding new information, or connecting the dots between what is his common assertion about the evils of high glycemic carbs and the pass he seems to give on them in the butt fat blast show.

What do you think? (Tell us in the Comments section below.)

Consider reading Dr. Oz’s 4-Step Butt-Blasting Plan, and then contemplate this answer to my query about carbs and diet I asked of Dr. Oz’s FAQ service operated by sharecare.com:

“You can enhance the weight-loss benefits of a low-carb, high-protein diet, or any weight loss plan for that matter, if you eat high-fiber complex carbs, including fresh whole fruits, vegetables, legumes and whole grains. Because fiber coats the stomach lining, it delays stomach emptying, slows digestion and sugar absorption after a meal, reducing the amount of insulin needed. This insulin response is what triggers hunger pangs – something you want to squelch when you’re trying to lose weight!”

“I tell my patients to eat from the rainbow, selecting different colors of fruits and vegetables to ensure optimal nutrition. These colorful, high-fiber complex carbs are filled with phytochemicals, bioflavinoids, carotenoids such as isoflavones, lycopene, and polyphenols, and other compounds that we know may reduce the risk of serious chronic illness.”

My bottom line:

Fat is fat, and even if spot reduction is possible with a specifically focused protocol, few people are overlarge in just one area and ideally sized everywhere else; therefore, adopt the diet that will be most useful overall to your weight and health.

That would be low, high quality carbs combined with plenty of lean protein and high quality (omega-3) fats.

Learn more about diet by reading my posts, Diet 101 and A Blueprint for Eating Right.

Over and out.

Share. Someone you know will be thankful.
Joe Garma
 

I help people live with more vitality and strength. I'm a big believer in sustainability, and am a bit nutty about optimizing my diet, supplements, hormones and exercise. To get exclusive Updates, tips and be on your way to a stronger, more youthful body, join my weekly Newsletter.

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